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How To Make Barista Coffee | Costa Coffee At Home

Few things in life are more satisfying than that first sip of coffee in the morning.

Whether you sip yours on the go or savour every last drop, you certainly deserve better than instant coffee!

But we know, the world of barista coffee can often seem confusing, like your local Costa baristas are mocha-making magicians.

But with the right tools and a bit of practice, you can make barista-grade coffee at home – who’d have thought?

We’ve partnered up with Costa so you can create every drink on the menu at home, with their signature coffee and a VonHaus coffee machine.

From barista-level machines to easy cafetieres, our selection of coffee tools suits every taste and level of coffee-making expertise.

Here’s how to make your favourite delicious Costa coffee at home:

 

#1 Americano

americano black coffee in a white mug on a wooden coaster with loose coffee beans on the sideamericano black coffee in a white mug on a wooden coaster with loose coffee beans on the side

 

A true classic, the Americano has quite the origin story.

During WWII, American soldiers stationed in Italy had an insatiable desire for coffee, but the Italian espresso fared too bitter for their tastes.

To recreate the drip coffee they loved back home, the crafty soldiers watered the espresso down, and the Americano was born.

Easy to make, the Americano has two ingredients: an espresso shot and hot water. You can add milk, of course, but some argue it negates the flavour. We say go with what tastes best for you!

For black coffee, it’s all about that rich, full-bodied flavour, so choosing the right ground coffee or beans is essential. Single-origin coffees – like Costa’s Signature Blend – are bolder and more flavourful, as they don’t balance flavours across different beans. So, if you’re looking for a simple but tasty coffee to get you going in the morning, pick up this pack!

What's the best way to make an espresso?

Before the espresso machine was created, moka pots were used to make the caffeine powerhouse that is an espresso shot. The moka pot features two chambers, and water is heated in the bottom chamber, rising as steam into the upper section with the espresso grounds, creating your espresso. 

Espresso machines gained widespread use in the 20th century, replacing moka pots as a more efficient method of making espresso shots. Using pressure to extract coffee from the grounds, the taste is smoother and more flavourful, but ultimately the method boils down to personal preference.

To use a moka pot, you need to first grind down your coffee beans into a fine powder – our grinders make short work of this process!  

For all of the recipes below, you can use a moka pot or an espresso machine to create your espresso shots.

 

Method:

  1. Use an espresso machine to make your espresso shot, or two depending on the strength you want. Simply add your Costa ground coffee and let the machine work its magic.
  2. For your mix, fill up your jug and submerge the milk steamer’s tip in the milk, putting it on full power and bringing it to the surface for a few seconds to get that foamy top. Resubmerge and keep to the side for a whirlpool effect; this allows for an even foamy top to the drink. Heat the jug until it’s almost too hot to hold and produces the latte’s signature steamed milk with a foamed top.
  3. Pour the espresso into a mug, then use the jug to pour in the milk slowly. Start holding the jug higher up, and slowly bring it down towards the surface. This will bring your foam to the top and maybe even get you started on some latte art.

If you wanted to make a flavoured latte, like your favourite vanilla or caramel Costa lattes, simply add a Costa Coffee syrup into the mug along with your espresso before adding the milk.

Ingredients:

1/ 2 espresso shots

250ml whole milk

#2 Latte

milk frother frothing milk next to glass with coffee inside milk frother frothing milk next to glass with coffee inside

 

Claims have been made that the latte’s origin dates back to the 1950s in the Caffe Mediterraneum in California.

Again, cappuccinos proved too strong for the American taste, so the milkier alternative was born. However, they didn’t hit peak popularity until the 1980s in Seattle.

For fans of Costa’s delicious milky lattes, you’re in luck, as they’re easy to make at home. Made up of milk with an espresso shot, a Costa latte is all about balancing flavour and froth. To make ours, we use Costa’s signature blend ground coffee and an espresso machine.

Here’s how to make the perfect Costa latte at home:

 

Method:

  1. Add milk to the jug and submerge the steamer’s nozzle, set it to full power and bring to the surface for 2 seconds until there is a very thin layer of foam on the surface.
  2. Resubmerge the nozzle and keep it to the side of the jug to create a whirlpool effect.
  3. Once the jug becomes too hot to hold, the milk is ready.
  4. Pour the milk in steadily, moving closer to the mug as you pour.

Ingredients:

1 espresso shot

100ml whole milk

  Non-dairy costa coffee recipes

Are you a non-dairy coffee drinker that’s bored of Americanos? Have no fear; you can replace the milk in these recipes. It might be a tad challenging to get the perfect froth – but you’ll get there!

#3 Flat white

latte in a blue mug next to a packed of costa coffee and a croissantlatte in a blue mug next to a packed of costa coffee and a croissant

 

Commonly mistaken for a latte, the flat white differs by having a smaller serving size and less milk foam on top. If you enjoy lattes but wish the coffee taste was a little stronger, the flat white is for you.

The history of this drink is a little blurry, with both Australia and New Zealand laying claim to its creation. The most famous story is that of a man from Wellington, NZ, who claimed the flat white was the product of a failed cappuccino at Bar Bodega in 1989.

 

Method:

  1. Add milk to the jug and submerge the steamer’s nozzle, set it to full power and bring to the surface for 2 seconds until there is a very thin layer of foam on the surface.
  2. Resubmerge the nozzle, keeping it to the side of the jug to create a whirlpool effect.
  3. Once the jug becomes too hot to hold, the milk is ready.
  4. Pour the milk in steadily, moving closer to the mug as you pour.

Ingredients:

1 espresso shot

100ml whole milk

#4 Mocha

mocha in a glass mug on a wooden surface surrounded by loose coffee beansmocha in a glass mug on a wooden surface surrounded by loose coffee beans

 

The mocha has a rich and winding history.

Back in the 17th century, the term denoted coffee made from mocha beans from Mocha in Yemen, the renowned coffee capital.

 Another theory is that in the 20th century, Americans were inspired by Italy’s Bicerin, a similar chocolatey coffee drink that used mocha beans from the 18th century!

Nowadays mochas are made with many types of coffee beans, as the mocha bean became rarer once Yemen’s coffee trade was eclipsed in the 1800s.

But while mocha’s history is convoluted, the taste is unmistakable.

The main difference between a mocha and Bicerin is that mochas are served mixed while the Bicerin’s ingredients are layered for the drinker to mix.

For something more indulgent, how about a mocha that blends coffee and hot chocolate? Costa’s signature Mocha Italia blend has a natural nutty, chocolatey aroma and a rich flavour, making it perfect for mochas at home.

 

Method:

  1. Brew your espresso shot and mix with the chocolate until smooth.
  2. Add milk to the jug before adding the milk frother’s tip just below the surface on full power. Steam until the milk has doubled.
  3. Pour the milk slowly onto the espresso, moving it closer to the surface as you pour to allow for a pattern to form.

Ingredients:

1 espresso shot

1 Teaspoon drinking chocolate

250ml whole milk

#5 Cappuccino

milk being poured into a cappuccino to create patternmilk being poured into a cappuccino to create pattern

 

Before the cappuccino, there was the Kapuziner and Franziskaner from Vienna, Austria. These were some of the first iterations of coffee with cream before the cappuccino graced Italy in the 1930s.

Named due to its colour’s similarity to priests’ Capuchin robes, the modern cappuccino came about in the 1950s when coffee machines advanced, producing higher pressure to create a finer grind and that signature crema.

 

Method:

  1. Brew your espresso shot.
  2. Fill the frothing jug with whole milk and place the frothing tip from your espresso machine at a slight tilt 1/2 below the milk’s surface. Don’t you fully submerge the frother, though, as it needs air from the milk’s surface to froth the milk.
  3. Turn the frother onto full power and ensure the jug is kept level. A whirlpool should form in the milk, causing the froth to mix evenly.
  4. Once the froth has doubled in volume, it’s ready to be poured, so add it immediately to your espresso.
  5. Pour the frothed milk into your espresso and enjoy!

Ingredients:

1 espresso shot

150ml whole milk

#6 French press

french press half full with coffee behind a mug of coffee and costa coffee packetfrench press half full with coffee behind a mug of coffee and costa coffee packet

 

First patented in France by inventors Mayer & Delforge, the French press (or cafetière) has seen many iterations over the years. A legend dating back to the 1950s, France attributes the invention to a certain Frenchman that, on an open fire, accidentally boiled his water before adding the coffee. 

He added his coffee grounds but, disappointingly, they just sat unbrewed on the water’s surface. Improvising, he procured a metal screen from a passing merchant and pushed his coffee down into the water using a stick and the screen.

 Bonjour la presse française!

Despite this quirky story, the French press’s blueprints were patented in America by Italians Giulio Moneta and Attilio Calimani in 1929, and further developed and patented in 1958 by a Swiss gent, Faliero Bondanini. This is the model that closely resembles the modern French press we all know and love.

 

Method using our 8 Cup French Press:

  1. Preheat the press by filling a quarter full with boiling water and pressing down. Swirl around for 10 seconds, then pour out the water and rinse.
  2. Grind your coffee beans coarsely using a coffee grinder.
  3. Add 54 grams or 8-10 tbsp of coarse coffee grounds to the press, and gently shake back and forth to allow the grounds to settle.
  4. Add 430ml of boiling water to the press, leave for 30 seconds, and a crust should form.
  5. After 30 seconds, stir the grounds, allowing the crust to break up and the coffee to mix with the water.
  6. Pour another 430ml of boiling water into the press and add the lid, leaving for a further 4 minutes.
  7. Push the plunger down slowly and immediately add to your mug, as leaving it in the press too long can cause the coffee to become bitter.

Ingredients:

54g or 8-10 tablespoons of coarse coffee grounds

860ml water

Instant cold brew with a cheeky twist

milk being poured into cold coffee with ice cubes on a wood coastermilk being poured into cold coffee with ice cubes on a wood coaster

 

Although we all enjoy more finely crafted coffee recipes, sometimes you just feel like a quick brew! While it’s not exactly our cup of tea (in every sense), instant coffee has improved over the years.

Here is one of our favourites, cooled with milk and a dash of whiskey for a boozy kick! 

 

Method:

  1. Add the teaspoon of instant coffee (and sugar if desired) to a mug.
  2. Add a very small splash of water, just enough to add a thin layer at the bottom of the mug.
  3. Stir the coffee and water with a spoon for 30 secs - 1 min, or until the mixture becomes foamy and most of the coffee dissolves. You can do this much quicker with a blender, which are also great for smoothies, soups, and more!
  4. Fill the mug with milk just past halfway while stirring away any coffee granules.
  5. Add a shot of Irish whiskey and stir – bourbon or scotch also work well!

For more delicious, refreshing iced coffee recipes, check out our popular guide here.

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon instant coffee

150ml semi-skimmed milk – for a lighter taste & a healthier touch

1 dash of water

1 teaspoon sugar

25ml Irish whiskey

  What is the most popular coffee at VonHaus HQ?

The number 1 ranked coffee in the UK is supposedly a latte, but we asked around the office to put this to the test. And the results may surprise you…

icons displaying the percentages of most popular coffee at vonhausicons displaying the percentages of most popular coffee at vonhaus

Or maybe not.

The latte was the most popular drink at VonHaus HQ, with instant coffee’s convenience and reliability making it a close second.

Espresso doesn’t get much love around these parts, but with the recent installation of one of our powerful 15-bar pro espresso machine, this may be subject to change…


Armed with the know-how to create a wide range of coffees the authentic way, what will you be making?

Let us know in the comments below!

For more tips, inspiration, and how-to guides, check out our blog today.

2021-01-26 09:51:00 0 viewed
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